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Defective Warrant Must Result In Suppression Of Evidence

Defective Warrant Must Result In Suppression Of Evidence

A Defendant filed a motion to suppress controlled dangerous substances (CDS) found during an illegal search in which a search warrant had allegedly been issued. The signature on the warrant was illegible, the signature line simply stated “JUDGE OF THE” and offered not even the Judge’s written name. The Detective present at trial in the event there were questions about the warrant but the detective was not the affiant when the warrant was obtained. The State argued that the warrant was to be presumed valid and that the burden of proof was on the defendant to prove the search warrant invalid in defendant’s motion to suppress evidence of an illegal search. The judge concluded that, pursuant to Rule 3:5-7(g), absent any bad faith she was bound to uphold the validity of the warrant and denied the motion to suppress. The NJ Appellate Division found, in State v. Riles, there was insufficient evidence to find the warrant was issued by a neutral judge and permitted the defendant to withdraw a guilty plea entered subject to appeal. Although there are restrictions on the manner in which police are to operate in securing evidence they believe to exist, searches are often faulty based on flawed warrants, failure to obtain warrants or other illegal and unscrupulous search methods. If you were arrested following a search in which illegal drugs, weapons, money or other substances were found on your person or in your vehicle, residence or other place which was under your control at the time, you should consult an experienced criminal defense attorney immediately to ensure your rights are protected. For more information about search and seizure, drug charges, gun charges, assault, burglary or other criminal offenses in New Jersey visit HeatherDarlingLawyer.com. This blog is for informational purposes and not intended to replace the advice of an attorney.

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